Yara Shahidi Speaks at ELLE’s Women in Hollywood Event

At ELLE’s 25th Women in Hollywood celebration held this Monday, Yara Shahidi among those honored. At only 18-years-old, Yara is the star of her own sitcom as well as an outspoken activism. It was no surprise that she chose to dedicate her speech to empowering others. Yara spoke about the importance of storytelling and how storytellers have one of the most important roles in society. She stressed the importance of diverse representation in all aspects of storytelling, whether history or fiction, as the place where people can first begin to see themselves and identify with that story. Shahidi concluded, “no matter what movement you decide to associate with, we are going to fight for you as a full human. Because you should be allowed the space to enter as a full, whole person.”

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“This is 18” Shares Young Women Coming of Age Worldwide

For the latest The New York Times project, “This is 18,” 22 young women around the world were asked to document peers from their communities. Each photographer comes from a diverse background with various stories to share. Some of the subjects had similar backgrounds to the photographers, while others were from their community but had completely different experiences. The project not only highlights the women photojournalists of the future, but also the significance of coming of age around the world. “This is 18” proves the connectedness we share in the 21st century global community.

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Women Honored on Country Music TV’s Biggest Night

This year, country music’s biggest night shifted its focus to honor the women of country music. Among the recipients of the Artists of the Year awards were Carrie Underwood, Miranda Lambert, Maren Morris, and Kelsea Ballerini. The night’s performances left audiences asking the question, “why aren’t more women on country radio?” Maren Morris stated that many people think “women don’t want to hear women. I will have to call BS on that one, because I grew up listening to women. That’s why I’m here today.” The night was filled with empowering speeches and a palpable sense of sisterhood.

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Manuel Solano’s Captivating Portraits of Powerful Women

The power of memory and personal experiences is so deeply rooted in an artist's work. This is especially true for Manuel Solano’s (they/them/theirs) portraits of women from pop culture and their family. After gradually becoming blind, they discovered a technique allowing them to create purely from memory. The subjects that they portray are powerful women they recall having impacted them in a specific way. Over the summer, Solano debuted Oronda at Berlin’s Open Forum which featured portraits of two of their aunts, Nicki Minaj, and Meryl Streep’s character from The Devil Wears Prada. The artist’s work challenges the patriarchal lens through which women are often viewed and features levels of depth into the women painted.

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Joan Semmel’s Feminist Paintings of The Body

For over four decades, artist Joan Semmel has been depicting the human form through a feminist perspective. She began experiencing gender discrimination early in her career, leading her into the world of feminist politics. Semmel has used her paintings to examine realistic shapes of the body, challenging the normal objectification of female forms. Through her numerous series, she continuously captured a personal view of what raw vulnerability and the female experience means to her. At 86 years old, Semmel sees feminism becoming stronger than ever, with more representation and progressive actions to showcase women artists.

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The Baby-Sitters Club is “Feminist by Design”

In the 1980s, Ann M. Martin was asked by Jean Feiwel to write a book series about babysitting– later known as The Baby-Sitters Club. The series was a success; Martin still receives letters to this day. At a recent panel at Smith College, women of all ages attended ranging from college students to 40-year-old women with their children. Even though the book series can be considered “feminist by design” as it addressed “taboo” topics during its time such as divorce, mental illness, and alcoholism as well as unique female friendship dynamics, Martin says that if re-written today amidst the #MeToo movement she, “might make the characters more active and involved, politically so. I think kids today are much more politically aware … That just wasn’t something that existed — not the way it does now — when I was writing the book back in the ’80s and ’90s.”

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Mother Shares Successes and Fears of Raising Daughters as Feminists

Freelance blogger Jenny Studenroth discussed her personal fears and tips on talking with her two young daughters about feminism. Emphasizing the love and joy she finds in her children, Studenroth also shares the added fear that unfortunately comes with having daughters in a patriarchal society. Giving young girls both the freedom to discuss their own experiences and the confidence to break out of gender norms are just a few of the ways that Studenroth highlights as useful in raising her own daughters. The struggle of bringing up children in the right way without pushing your own views on them too firmly is a difficulty that many parents can relate to, yet Studenroth’s candid article may offer some useful advice to those in need. The importance of making sure that future generations carry on the positive work of their parents cannot be underestimated; true improvement is often seen to come from younger generations, so this valuable bond between mothers and daughters is key for the future of feminism.

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Community Meeting Took Place in Nigeria to Combat FGM

Eight communities from the Imo State in Nigeria came together for a discussion on violence against young women and girls in their areas, organized by the Development Dynamics (DD). All community leaders resolved to end female genital mutilation (FGM), the main topic of discussion. FGM is defined by the World Health Organization as “all procedures that involve partial or total removal of the external female genitalia, or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons.” Any parent inflicting FGM on their child will now be punished according to Imo State Law. This move from community leaders will hopefully set a strong precedent for other members of the community and be an important step towards eradicating this form of violence against women.

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Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Time to Take Care of Your Breasts

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, so it’s the perfect time to be conscious of your breast health. Breast cancer is an unfortunately common issue for millions of women across the world. Genetics and lifestyle choices are considered risk factors, and it’s recommended to get regular exams if you have a history of breast cancer in your family. In general, women should start getting regular breast exams when they turn 20, scheduling appointments every one to three years. As for older women, it’s recommended to get a check-up every year. Self-exams are also extremely important. Staying active, making conscious food choices, practicing self-care, and examining your breasts are small ways you can stay healthy and take care of your breast health.

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Your Period is Talking to You

Periods can say a lot about a person’s overall health. Dr. Joseph Chang of Parkland Health and Hospital system, and Dr. Michael Guarnaccia, reproductive endocrinologist at Extend Fertility, warn against some symptoms that can be signs of bigger health problems. Irregular periods can be a sign of a thyroid issue, as the thyroid can cause hormonal imbalances that impact your menstrual cycle. Irregular periods are also a sign of being overly stressed, or having a hidden chronic illness, such as kidney issues or chronic infections. If your period is extremely painful, it could be telling you that you might be suffering from endometriosis, a condition that causes uterine cells to grow and shed out of your uterus. Finally, if you’re bleeding more heavily than usual, you might be iron deficient or having more serious uterus issues, such as fibroids, or polyps. Pay attention to what your period is telling you, and if you notice something unusual, consult your OB/GYN.

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Gender Sensitization Course Aims to Reduce Sexual Violence in Bengaluru

A unique eight-week course has been developed at Baduku Community College to teach men how to contribute to a gender-equal society. The course covers everything from interacting with women to supporting them in getting equal footing, as well as cooking, cleaning, and looking after children. These skills are almost always left to women in traditional Indian societies, so addressing this domestic inequality is a first step for women taking an equal place in their communities. Furthermore, in taking on stereotypically female roles, the first 13 participants were also encouraged to engage in urgent conversations about gender, especially in the wake of the Indian #MeToo movement. In future, the principal of the college, Murali Mohan Kati, wants to include women in the program, as they are conditioned by the patriarchal system they live in just as much as the men. While courses such as these may seem extreme to some, they are evidence of true desire for change and a targeted effort to create more equal communities.

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Worrying Suicide Rates Amongst Latinas in the U.S.

A study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that 10.5% of Latina adolescents aged 10–24 years in the U.S. have attempted suicide in the past year, compared to 7.3% of white females, 5.8% of Latinos, and 4.6% white male teens. A cultural upbringing that highly stigmatizes mental health issues, paired with generational divides between first-generation girls and immigrant parents, is believed to be part of the cause of this severe issue, according to Dr. Luis Zayas, a researcher on Latina suicide trends since 1991. Latinas have been historically vulnerable to mental health struggles, and only 20% of them actually talk to a doctor about their troubles. Factoring into this is the lack of diversity and cultural competence in the mental health workforce, which is predominantly white. Addressing cultural and societal stigmas can help improve these trends. Normalizing mental health struggles and focusing on suicide prevention is needed now more than ever for Latinas in the United States.

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A Letter to the Little Girl in My Shoes

As someone with eighteen years of vivid wisdom, my past experiences have slowly shaped me into becoming the person I am today. This kind of experience can only be taught through time itself, and this is the constant weakness of an innocent child. In her own naive youth, I want to highlight my own experiences as a female, and give my younger cousin advice on how to navigate life when there isn’t necessarily a road map available.

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Gender Parity in Ethiopian Government


In uplifting news, Ethiopia’s prime minister declared that their ministry is now 50% female, meaning that half of the government is made up of female politicians. This is a drastic push for gender equality in their government, which has the second largest population in all of Africa. This push is due in large part to Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, who has spent countless months making progressive action within the country. The new cabinet, also known as the Ministry of Peace, is included women for the first time in the country's history. Dubbed as one of the most important ministries in the country, this sudden push for gender parity could have significant effects on the country’s outtake on society.

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When Will The U.S Be A Feminist Nation?

In the upcoming midterm elections, there has been an enormous trend of female politicians running for office. Statistics show a drastic increase from 920 to 26,000 women who have shown interest in being candidates for office from 2016 to now. Although it may seem like a giant leap in women’s equality, it is still a long battle for equality. According to the Washington Post, “No state is even close to equal representation”. About a quarter of political positions in this country are held by women, but this statistics gets even smaller the higher up in political status that you go through. There are 1,977 women in governmental positions in this country, which means that our country would need to elect about 2,006 more to reach a definite equality. Despite our long road to actual progress, women have certainly made the necessary strides to make this a future possibility.

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Women Set To Change The Fate of Abortion in Australia

In an effort to reverse a piece of legislation passed in 1899 that places abortion as a criminal offense, Parliament is meeting to discuss this piece of legislation and possibly change it. For decades, activists have made it a priority to take out this piece from the law books and consistently failed to get their desired outcome, yet the upcoming hearing could spell a completely new outcome for history. In a turn of events, women will lead the debate as they’ve been able to acquire a large seating in Parliament. This female majority is something that has arisen after decades of diligent effort to give women a vote in Australia. The upcoming vote has arisen as an amazing opportunity, but some see it as a test to see whether women will be able to legislate issues that directly matter to them.

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Donna Strickland Breaks Boundaries with Nobel Prize

As only the third woman in history to receive a Nobel prize, Donna Strickland yearns for more woman, like herself, to earn the honor. Strickland’s initial reaction to finding out she was only the third woman in history to receive the award left her dumbfounded and sparked a conversation about women’s underrepresentation. She told Now Toronto that she did not put her gender into account when following her dreams and stuck to her work ethic and drive while doing rigorous research. According to the article, women are paving a path for young women in a number of fields but are not being acknowledged for their hard work and determination. The belief that older generations must mentor and guide more young women in their fields is important to Strickland and her work.

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CareerKendall RotarNews
Breastfeeding Increases Wage Gap According to Experts

Research conducted by the Chicago Tribune shows that women in the workplace are experiencing increased discrimination and wage loss because of breastfeeding. Women have been speaking out about this issue due to the implementation of pods for women to breastfeed in and the accommodation of men’s discomfort over women’s comfort. NPR producer Alexis Diao states that there is an “intense pressure” to prove that women are working at the same level as they were before childbirth and breastfeeding. The “unforgiving culture” in the workplace causes a big increase in the wage gap for women bearing children. An incompatibility with breastfeeding and maternal responsibility is hindering women’s chances to succeed in the workplace after choosing to have a family. Past studies have shown that women who breastfed their children less or not at all experienced a smaller wage loss than those women who breastfed frequently.

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CareerMake Muse TeamNews
India Pledges Safety in Workplace

Earlier this week, India took initiatives to promote workplace safety for women. Sexual harassment in the workplace has become a central issue in the country’s legislature, and officials are keen on mending this problem. The law states that a current female staff member in a senior executive position acts as an officer to the women in the office to provide a safe, consistent voice if need be. This officer is joined by a committee of women in the workplace who are committed to and passionate about keeping their co-workers safe. Any female employee is allowed to confide in the committee or officer about any uncomfortable behavior or harassment she may experience.

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CareerMake Muse TeamNews