All Eyes on Me

Illustrator Mary Sutton notes that putting yourself out there and speaking your mind can be difficult, especially as a woman. Exposing her work, an extension of herself, to others has always been something that she’s especially struggled with. In an era where all our lives are available online, however, everything we do is trackable and therefore judge-able. Successes and failures can be broadcast with equal permanence.

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#MeToo Movement Yet to Progress the Music Industry

The #MeToo Movement has taken much of the entertainment industry by storm, particularly film and television. However, in the music industry, things are slow to change, if at all. The public reaction to an accusation against Simon Le Bon is the latest to show that the music industry will not make the same adjustments against sexual harassment, especially as the "bad boy" "rock star" personas are expected, and even liked, for male stars. 

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Aline Kominsky-Crumb: Can Women be Anti-Heroes too?

Self-loathing and often controversial, Aline Kominsky-Crumb’s cartoons instill her tragedies with humor and turn her complaints into comedy. Although lacking the decorum of her contemporaries, Kominsky-Crumb’s works illustrate an honest female experience while also taking time to critique a society that all at once rejects her and accepts Woody Allen. The cartoons, which feature her alter-ego, Bunch, tackle her own self-loathing alongside death, sexuality, and love. Unapologetically controversial, Kominsky-Comb challenges the status-quo on female likeability with her integrity and absurdity.

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Music and Feminism in the Electronic Age

Although women have made substantial contributions to the world of electronic music, the arts realm is far less progressive than it may seem. However, Nancy Lee, Soledad Fatima Muñoz, Ash Luk, and Alexandria Chen have a plan to change that. Their symposium, CURRENT: Feminist Electronic Art Symposium 2.0, aims to help build a more inclusive club culture by making a space for artists to come together and discuss, share, and create - free of charge. CURRENT runs from July 25-29; more information regarding tickets and specific locations can be found on their website.   

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The Other Half of the Picture

Stemming from the sentiments of a 1989 poster from the Guerilla Girls, The Brooklyn Museum’s latest exhibit, “Half the Picture: A Feminist Look at the Collection,” highlights feminist art from the Civil Rights era to the #MeToo movement. With work from over fifty diverse artists, the exhibit hopes to contribute to relevant socio-political topics as well as those of the past including the aftermath of WWI and the Civil Rights movement. “Half the Picture” will be on display at the Brooklyn Museum in New York, NY from August 31st until March 31, 2019.

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Study Reveals Potential Gender Bias in Film Criticism

A new study was conducted by the Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film which revealed a disparity in female vs. male critics reviewing films starring women and films by women directors. A trend revealed that male critics tend to rate films starring women and films by women directors lower than female critics​​​​​​​ and that there is a higher number of male critics than female. Film critics affect a movie's visibility and success, so this disparity (coupled with the lack of progress in representation in the industry) might pose a threat to equal representation. 

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Community Garden Sends Proceeds to Rwandan Women

Celebrating its tenth anniversary this month, the volunteer-run Green and Gold Community Garden at University of Alberta farm is making a difference for women in Rwanda. All earnings from the produce sales go to the Tubahumurize Women Association, a women's project in Rwanda that provides trauma counseling and other support for survivors of violence. The founder of Tubahumurize Women Association, Jeanne Mwiliriza, will be visiting the garden as well as giving a presentation about the project in honor of the garden's tenth anniversary.

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Enough: Robbed of Innocence

0.2 miles. 2 blocks. 5 minutes. That was all it took for Author Melanie Rodriguez and her friends to be catcalled three times on the walk from school to the local bookshop. One man walked past us. One rolled down his car window. One was on his bike. We were just 15 years old; still carrying our school bags. We were furious. That day, we were robbed of our innocence.

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Middle-Aged Women Work to Revive Democracy

An interview with Harvard professor Theda Skocpol highlights the influence of "networked women's groups" in galvanizing protest and mobilizing voters. Skocpol argues that it's time for liberals to return to the fundamentals of political organizing, and she discusses the leadership roles assumed by middle-aged and older women in such grassroots movements. She attributes more traditional motivations such as the principles of good government and decency to the development of this progressive and pragmatic political force.

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Champion Women: Critique Women's Policies, Not Appearances

Independent Women's Voice, a conservative nonprofit organization, launched Champion Women, a non-partisan movement dedicated to supporting and amplifying women. Influential political women--both conservative and liberal--like Sarah Huckabee Sanders and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand came together to form this site to champion other women in politics and call out sexism in the political arena. The movement encourages people to constructively criticize female politicians on the basis of their beliefs and policies, rather than their appearances or other superficial qualities. 

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#BecauseOfHerWeCan: Honoring Indigenous Australian Women

The #BecauseOfHerWeCan hashtag is bringing to light the stories of noteworthy Indigenous Australian women. The “because of her, we can” slogan is also the theme of this year’s NAIDOC Week, a celebration of indigenous culture founded by the National Aboriginal and Islanders Day Observance Committee. This year’s festival focuses on the power of women. It highlights women who have fought for change during times of sexism, discrimination, racism, and oppression.

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What Kavanaugh’s Nomination Entails for Reproductive Rights

Given Justice Anthony Kennedy’s retirement, Donald Trump has nominated D.C. District Court of Appeals Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. Kavanaugh is known for conservative decisions, so many worry that women’s access to safe healthcare including birth control and abortion may be limited. The hashtag #OneInFour has begun to appear on Twitter following the nomination, signaling that one in four women will have an abortion by the time they are forty-five years old. The uncertainty of what the confirmation of this nomination may bring is worrisome. HelloGiggles speaks with Dr. Logan Levkoff on what this appointment could potentially mean for reproductive rights.

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Non-Traditional Female Candidates Rewrite Political Playbook

This election cycle, female candidates are breaking traditional rules for how they should present themselves. Political ads like those of 29-year-old Abby Finkenauer, Democratic Congressional candidate, and Wisconsin Senator Tammy Baldwin, display complexity, vulnerability, and individuality. Female candidates are discussing policy intertwined with personal stories, displaying traditionally taboo physical attributes like tattoos and natural hair, and directly calling out sexist men. Christine K. Jahnke, consultant to Democratic women, stated women are "rewriting the playbook" when it comes to campaigning. 

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Fighting Years of Con Harassment Under #MeToo

Comic Con, held every year in San Diego, boasts over 130,000 attendees consisting of fans, artists, collectors, and more; however, this high volume of attendees reports high instances of harassment especially towards those in cosplay. Even though the con aims to ensure the safety of participants, it cannot guarantee help for what happens outside of their reach. In 2014, Geeks for CONsent petitioned for formal anti-harassment policy to be instituted at Comic-Con with a slogan that read “Cosplay does not equal consent.” Now, during the time of the #MeToo movement, attendees are hopeful that this problem will not be ignored.

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Ro Jackson: Revolutionizing Media Coverage of Female Athletes

Ro founded SLOWE in 2017 as a response to the difficulty of engaging with women’s sport as a fan – something she’d been struggling with personally for a long time. Before starting the platform she worked as a designer and believes the aesthetic and quality of coverage is integral to it’s success. SLOWE is founded on the principal that the audience is there, we just need to give them better content. 

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