Posts in Activism
Lina Fernandez: Young Activism Knows No Age

At seventeen years old, Lina Fernandez has used her voice to spread awareness about voting rights as well as protest anti-feminist policies in the United States. A Key West, Florida native of Cuban-American descent, she is currently a high school student in Homestead, FL. She has dedicated her time this year to spreading awareness about the 2018 midterm elections and voting rights

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It’s Complicated: Examining #MeToo and Feminism One Year Later

As a college student, I was immediately struck by the Avital Ronell incident. Coming from a university that boasts some of the world’s most elite academics, it is not difficult for me to imagine Reitman’s situation. In the same way that Harvey Weinstein convinced young actresses their careers were on the line if they refused his advances, powerful professors have an unbelievable hold over their students. That dynamic remains the same regardless of the victim’s gender identity.

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The Hidden Drain of Emotional Labour

I personally find that the more I talk about issues I am passionate about, ranging from gender equality to animal rights, the more people come to me with questions. We become known as spokespersons for our chosen fights, and that’s great when we have the energy and time. But what happens when this role becomes more than we can handle? How do we avoid being assigned the role of the world’s educator?

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The Power of the Petition

Activism doesn’t always have to mean attending a protest or a rally- and in fact, such a narrow definition of activism is limiting, exclusive and can be inaccessible to many people. Besides just geographical distance, not everyone can afford to take the weekend to march, even if the cause directly affects them. While showing up for such demonstrations is important, the Internet has made activism much more accessible and far-reaching.

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Feminist Parenting Groups: A New Wave of Activism

A new wave of activism is joining college campuses in the fall. The University of Kansas is hosting a feminist parenting group meant for participant to learn “strategies for raising intersectional feminist children.” The university’s Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equality, emphasizes the group’s purpose as “intersectional trans-inclusive feminism” that will allow individual to advocate not only for themselves but others “through a social justice lens.” The goal is for parents to know the necessary techniques to raise children and nurture intersectional feminist youth by learning at least one new skill or resource at each meeting session.

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Greater Resources Needed for Seattle’s Native American Women

94% out of 148 self-identified Native American women in Seattle shared they had been raped in a survey; however, only 20% of those women reported it to the police. The alarming rates of sexual violence amongst Native American women can be attributed to many factors including “historical trauma of colonialism.” The report on the high violence rate is highlighting the need for greater resources for the Native American community. One of the current sources for funding resources, the Violence Against Women Act, is to be renewed in September. If approved by Congress, the act will be renewed for five more years.

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Saudi Arabian Female Activist Faces Death Penalty

Saudi Arabia has recently been in the spotlight for changing some of the country’s strict moral code under the new crown prince’s rule. However, the country (which has one of the largest execution rates in the world) is looking to charge a 29-year-old female activist with the death penalty. The activist’s work centers on exploring rights for the Shiite Muslim minority. Even with the large execution rates, to apply the death penalty in Saudi Arabia for a nonviolent political crime is unusual. This, along with recent arrest of women driving activists, seem to be a reinforcement of the notion that any changes made are simply a “gift of the monarch” but not effected through social change.  

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Tips for Being an Intersectional Feminist this Women's Equality Day

Women's Equality Day is celebrated yearly on August 26th to commemorate the passage of the 19th amendment, giving women the right to vote. Though this day is remembered for being one that made women more equal to men, we know that more work must be done. To be equal, we must continue to make strides for women of all backgrounds all around the world. These feminist influencers, bloggers, artists, and change makers offered their tip or suggestions as to how to practice intersectional feminism today, on Women's Equality Day, but really every day, to ensure that we're continuing to make strides and push for a truly equal world. 

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Feminist Fight Song: Aretha Franklin’s “Respect”

Although not a self-declared “feminist heroine,” Aretha Franklin’s songs of strength and empowerment resonated with waves of women. In 2014, Franklin told Rolling Stone “I don’t think I was a catalyst for the women’s movement. Sorry. But if I were? So much the better!” Even though she may not have intended for “Respect” to become a feminist anthem, it became known as an anthem for both civil rights and feminism. Even more proof of her influence? Franklin was the first woman to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987 serving as an example to women around the world.


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How The ACLU Wishes to Continue RBG’s Mission

This month, the ACLU announced they are  suing Attorney General Jeff Sessions as a challenge to his issued directive that domestic abuse and gang violence are no longer grounds for asylum. This lawsuit is part of a year-long project highlighting different forms of gender discrimination serving as the ACLU’s “vision for social justice.” In 1972 RBG founded the Women’s Rights Project; Lenora Lapidus, current director of the Women’s Rights Project, states “We thought that now is really an opportune moment for us to launch this concerted effort to showcase and keep the public's attention focused on all of the different ways in which gender discrimination persists.”

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#MeToo Leader Asia Argento Paid Accuser

After publicly accusing Harvey Weinstein of sexual assault, Italian actress Asia Argento became one of the #MeToo movement’s leaders. Recently, at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival, Argento delivered an impassioned speech stating Weinstein had sexually assaulted her at the very place in 1997. However, when Jimmy Bennett, a young actor and musician, made claims that Argento had sexually assaulted him when he was just 17, Argento arragened to pay $380,000 to her own accuser. Several documents, such as a selfie of Argento and Bennett, were sent to the New York Times through an anonymous encrypted email.


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Women's March Series

The Women’s March shattered my preconceived image of political protests. We were necessitating and demanding a change. By marching, we represented an active refusal of our society’s current state. A year and a half later, I am grateful that I have photos that illuminate the indescribable energy and momentum of 470,000 people who gathered for the first official Women’s March.

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As Iraq’s GDP Falls, Early Marriage Increases

Currently, child advocates are concerned that the recent changes in Iraq’s government will allow early marriage advocates to push bills that support their favored age of consent; therefore, causing already alarming child marriage rates to rise even more. A 2017 study by Oxfam, a global anti-poverty group, found “a direct correlation between the rise of child marriage in Iraq and war-induced poverty and terror.” Many of the victims are so young that they are often uneducated and disempowered. Nuha Oum Ahmed states, “breaking away from the thinking that there is some benefit to girls from child marriage is going to take a long time and will demand a comprehensive approach.”

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Rebuilding Lives in the City of Joy

The City of Joy, located in Bukavu, Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), is a “transformational leadership community for women survivors of violence.” This community-based program helps women who have been victims of rape and torture due to war in the surrounding areas; the program aims to help them rebuild their lives in order for them to become leaders of their communities. A Netflix documentary by the same name, City of Joy, set to premiere on September 7th, portrays the stories of the many women that make up the City of Joy.

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Lucy Stone: 200 Years of Activism

West Brookfield, Massachusetts is gearing up for Lucy Stone’s 200th birthday celebration.  Lucy was an outspoken activist in the 19th century, both a feminist and an abolitionist. Despite making great progress in their feminist endeavors, Stone and her companions were silenced in audiences that included men. However, Lucy Stone was determined to have women’s voices heard across all areas and shatter the male resistance to feminism.

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