Posts in Art & Photography
Call For Inclusion In the Pittsburgh Art Scene

Making strides for further inclusion in the Pittsburgh creative scene, “Art on the Walls: A Retrospective Movement” honors the talents of African American women artists. Featured at the Pittsburgh Downtown Gallery Crawl, the exhibition seeks to feature more artists from minority backgrounds and create an accessible approach to art for all. The show includes work by members of Women of Visions, Inc.- an organization that educates African American women on how to promote their art. While there are still diversity problems within the creative field, groups like Women of Visions hope that expanding their artists’ work will open up more dialogue about inclusion and art. The show will take place from September 21 to January 2019.

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Exhibit Dedicated To Middle Eastern Women Artists

With 31 women artists from 12 countries, “I AM: Middle Eastern Women Artists and the Quest To Build Peace,” addresses common misconceptions of Middle Eastern women. While the artists all feature work in different mediums, they share a common goal in showing that women in their communities are influential in the contemporary art world. The exhibition aims at sharing personal stories of each artist, showcasing the strength and power they have, both personally and publicly. Mostly, it also proves that art is now a global discussion and an effective way to share narratives that are not commonly heard. The exhibition will run through October 10 at the Vanderbilt Fine Arts Gallery in Nashville, Tennessee.

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Artist Imagined As Historic African Women

British-Liberian artist Lina Iris Viktor began a deep exploration into her identity after moving to the United States—finding a link between her parents’ country of origin and her new home. Bringing to life lost narratives, Viktor’s work is a reminder of the impact of forgotten history in today’s world. In A Haven. A Hell. A Dream Deferred, she interprets herself as the Libyan Sybil, while in Yaa Asantewaa as the Ashanti warrior queen. The boldness of her motifs and striking use of color signify the importance of learning about one’s roots and applying them to the present.

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Not 30% Challenges Gender Discrimination in Art World

Tackling gender bias in creative fields, Not 30% is the most recent site to be launched in The Other Art Fair. In protest to the disproportion of female and male artists shown in exhibitions and collections, the site is dedicated wholly to showcasing women’s work. According to the project Gallery Tally, only 30% of artists represented in galleries are women, yet 60% of art school graduates are women. Curator Kate Bryan plans to make changes to these statistics. With a wide range of artists, the goal is to create a safe space where creatives can get exposure and tackle a male dominated industry. Not 30% will take place October 4-7 at Old Central St. Martins in London, England.

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Women Pushing Boundaries With Metal Art

Whether it be conscious or subconscious, the general public typically places mediums into either fine or decorative arts. Metal works especially are gendered and filed into one of these two categories- with smelting being seen as masculine and high art, and jewelry making being feminine and crafty. Heavy Metal, the current Women to Watch exhibit at the National Museum of Women in the Arts, challenges theses assumptions. The submission requirements called for any use of metalwork, giving a broad range of interpretation. Pieces range from jewelry to abstraction, all with a shared goal to stop gendering of metal art.

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Accessible Public Art and Feminism

When focusing on urban art, accessibility and storytelling have always been critical matters. Surfaces, the latest exhibit to hit Montreal’s street art scene, features a diverse group of artists sharing varying works. Two of the artists, Miss Me and Cedar Eve explore the political and personal sides of themselves and society. Miss Me’s piece makes a strong statement in today’s climate, with nude females posed with phrases such as , “IT’S NOT ME, IT’S YOU.” Cedar Eve looks at her own First Nations roots to produce energetic, vibrant works paying homage to her identity. The works will be open to the public at the Promenade des Artistes in the Quartier des Spectacles until October 28.

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Documenting The Power Between Women and Reading

Artist Carrie Schneider explores the connection between women and the power of knowledge in the photo series Reading Women. Each photograph focuses on the intimacy of women in their homes with books personally chosen by each. Including the names of each women and titles of the books, Schneider shows how personal learning can be. Reading Women will be on display until September 9 at the Miller Institute for Contemporary Art at Carnegie Mellon University.

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Joan Semmel’s Porn for Women

Although shunned from the art world of the 70s for her realist painting style and focus on the female nude, artist Joan Semmel has been “rediscovered” by a new generation that embraces her erotic, yet honest paintings. Her work focuses on portraying the female form as it truly appears - with stomach rolls, freckles, and greying hair. Semmel is comfortable in her candor, making erotica not for a male audience, but rather, for women’s arousal.

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Feminist Dick Pics

With its walls covered in an array of penis art, the Stadtgalerie Saarbrücken’s newest exhibit, “In the Cut - The Male Body in Feminist Art,” is an insight into sexuality from a feminine lens. Feminist art stalwarts Susan Silas, Joan Semmel, ORLAN, Eunice Golden, and many others have been brought together for the exhibit which examines ideas of shame, liberation, and power in sexuality. The exhibit is a collection of paintings, photographs, and videos that implore the viewer to examine their own values and identity. “In the Cut - The Male Body in Feminist Art” will be on display until September 30 at the Stadtgalerie Saarbrücken in Saarbrücken, Germany.

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“Tracing the Red Thread”

Eco-feminist Mira Lehr’s latest work, “Tracing the Red Thread,” examines the environmental issues facing Florida’s ecosystem. The piece is a complicated interactive labyrinth meant to mirror the complicated issue of resolving the threats to Florida’s shoreline. Lehr hopes to bring attention to the importance of environmentalism through her piece because “If the ocean gets sick, we get sick…”. “Mira Lehr: Tracing the Red Thread” is on display at the Museum of Contemporary Art in North Miami until September 6.

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Racism in Abstract: Howardena Pindell’s Activism Through Art

Howardena Pindell’s work has long since married activism and with the abstract, creating compelling pieces that speak to her experiences with racism while also feminising traditionally masculine art forms. Currently a teacher at the State University of New York, Stony Brook, Pindell has worked in the art world since the 1970s, where she experienced the art world’s inequalities first hand. Her latest exhibit, “Howardena Pindell: What Remains to be Seen,” explores police brutality, racial injustice in housing, and student protests through a series of forms including abstract. “Howardena Pindell: What Remains to be Seen” is on view at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, VA until November 25.

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Where Women Belong

According to online art gallery Saatchi, 70% of art in galleries was created by men. Amidst LA’s ever-evolving art scene, Art Women Art Week seeks to give women an opportunity to have their work displayed and appreciated. Several artists have come together for the exhibit which features a female DJ each night and female-centric conversation. Saatchi, the organizer of the event, claims that they are seeking to empower women artists and put them in their place - right next to men. RSVP for Art Women Art Week online or by phone through August 26.

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A Woman Beyond Her Time: Berthe Morisot

Having died unaccredited for her work, impressionist painter Berthe Morisot never achieved the acclaim of other contemporary impressionists such as Monet and Manet. Morisot was a female innovator who defied the norms of her nineteenth century society but, because of her sex, her influential and groundbreaking work was disregarded and lost to time. Thanks to The Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, however, Morisot’s work will be recognized in a touring retrospective exhibit that will explore the unique ways she portrayed youth and vulnerability. The exhibit will run through September 23 in Québec before travelling to the United States.

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For Mary Pratt, Life is Beautiful

Through her works artist Mary Pratt called attention to the small beauties in domestic life. Throughout her career, Pratt would receive praise from women who claimed her paintings added a sense of heroism to their lives at times when they felt forgotten. Although her fixation on feminine subjects may have hindered her from wider success, Pratt was a wonderful example of the talent of women and a champion for the dismissed.

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Turkey’s Artistic Erasure

Art and politics have always gone hand in hand. So, when President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan of Turkey set out to heel the Turkish art scene, he was met with artistic protests. Although artists previously felt comfortable opposing Erdoğan’s regime, a slew of arrests have caused political activists to become increasingly wary of speaking out against his authoritarianism. Amidst a declining art economy, Turkey’s situation questions art’s role in free speech and the well being of a nation.

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“The Dinner Party” and a Few Missing Guests

Judy Chicago’s iconic contribution to feminist art, “The Dinner Party”, has been hailed as the core inspiration for Second-wave feminism. However, it’s flaws reveal the weak points within modern feminism and the importance of historical context. Created before modern progressivism, “The Dinner Party” has been critiqued especially for its approach towards black women and its importance on genitalia in femininity. The controversy around Chicago’s piece invites modern feminists to examine not only their ideology, but themselves.

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Feminine Power

Femininity and the expression of the feminine has been confusingly (and sometimes misguidedly) reflected in our society, its image ricocheting across surfaces of different textures and layers with different purposes--sometimes empowering, sometimes demeaning, sometimes both? We examine the complicated relationship behind feminine power and its intention.

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Radical Women and the Feminist Issue of Racism

Faith Ringgold’s 1971 mural “For the Women’s House” depicts a collage of multi-ethnic women engaging in then radical acts: riding a bus, having interracial children, and playing basketball. Although commonplace now, the women in her painting are engaging in the social taboos of the past, breaking the mold for their era. For Ringgold, as well as many other black women artists of her time, it was important to intersect feminism with the fight against racism as the patriarchy tethers together both sexism and racism to establish its power. Ringgold’s painting is on display at the Boston Institute of Contemporary Art as a part of the “We Wanted A Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965 to 1985” until September 30th.

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