All in Fashion

Just in time for the end of 2018, Forbes released it’s annual list of the highest-paid fashion models. Leading the pack by a large margin is Kendall Jenner, who raked in $22.5 million between June 2017 and June 2018. Karlie Kloss, Cara Delevigne, Gigi Hadid, and other familiar names follow suit, all with earnings of $8 million and above. While no one is shaming this group of women for having great success over the past several months, the list has created some controversy over the continued lack of diversity in the fashion industry.

Chanel made headlines this week when it announced that it was banning the use of exotic skins. While many industry insiders were shocked by the news, some of the brand’s signature pieces—including the sharkskin Boy Bag and Mini Flap in alligator—vanished from its website.

If you follow runway fashion, chances are you’ve heard of Halima Aden. At 21 years old, Aden is making history as the first Muslim woman to wear hijab in fashion shows. Born in a Kenyan refugee camp after her family escaped the Somali civil war, Aden arrived in the States speaking no English and feeling self-conscious of her outsider status. Years later, she’s catapulted from high school homecoming queen to a contract with IMG.

A recent report on the state of fashion in 2019 conducted by McKinsey & Company revealed that only 20% of the 500 companies examined made 128% of the industry’s total profit in 2017. 97% of that profit came from just 20 companies, including “super winners” like Hermès, H&M, and Inditex (the parent company of Zara).

The past few years have been an explosive time for plus-size fashion industry. From plus-size models on the runways, in everyone’s Instagram feed, and in advertisements, the options for dressing the average American woman are more diverse than ever. When it comes to truly integrating these pieces into mainstream, however, a lot of progress is undone.