The Color Pink, Post-Pussy Hat

 
 
 

Over the past few centuries, the color pink has picked up several divisive associations: femininity, sex appeal, and, more recently, the brash, bold hue of the pussy hat. In a new exhibition open through January 5, the Museum at FIT seeks to explore the shade’s complicated history. The display of over 80 garments includes 18th-century dresses to 1930s vamp gowns and 1960s rayon looks. Although the exhibition ultimately dissects the color’s relevance to all gender identities, what is most striking is the way pink has been used to typify women. Case in point: While the late-20th century saw soft pink idealized as the epitome of femininity and girlishness, in the 1800s pink undergarments were considered a sign of sexual promiscuity. 

 

For Further Reading:

It seems that this fall is a seasoning of reckoning for many in fashion studies: At the same time as the FIT exhibit, San Francisco’s de Young Museum is staging a special exhibit on Muslim fashion.

 

Discussion Question:

What is your relationship with the color pink? How has some of the information in this article made you shift your perceptions, if at all?

 

Action Item:

Apparently pink is a polarizing color! Challenge yourself to wear pink one day this week— whether you love it or not. 

 

 

Read more on The Economist |  Image: The Museum at FIT


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